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Looking for Lara
Looking for Lara, 2008
Öl auf MDF
87 x 120 cm
Lara, 2008
Aquarell auf Papier
51 x 36cm
I clearly remember where the other man grabs Lara’s’ arms roughly and says ’There are two types of women in the world.
The first is a hedonist and at the mercy of her senses. The other is noble and makes sacrifices. You know which one you are’.  She slaps him. Anna, 2008
Öl auf MDF
80 x 60 cm
I remember it snowing. Snow, snow, snow, wind, changing seasons and the wide vistas of the landscape.
There was a long road to the castle with the snow-covered domes, 2008
Öl auf MDF
87 x 120 cm
I remember that Lara was graceful and beautiful.I think I was in love with her,I still am, 2008
Öl auf MDF
49 x 69 cm
I remember the dark and wolves howling in the night, 2008
Öl auf MDF
122 x 154 cm
Lara og Juri. I remember seeing the film as a child with my mother. She cried a lot. 
I remember the dark browns, the long shadows and the lace. Linda, 2008
Öl auf MDF
87 x 120 cm
I remember Yuri being captured by soldiers. I think one of them said that there was no longer room for privacy
and that Yuri must serve as a doctor for the Army. The soldier is suddenly speaking English with a Russian accent. Vibeke
Öl auf MDF
80 x 60 cm
I remember the scene where Yuri is sitting in the trolley. It is autumn. He is a downtrodden,
unhappy person - a broken Soviet man. Lara gets off. She wears a Soviet outfit: a blue-gray coat,
a scarf on her head and a little bag in her hand. It reminded me of Tintin. Anders
Öl auf MDF
87 x 115 cm
Lara, Moscow, 2008,
Aquarell auf Papier
45 x 60 cm
fLara 2., Moscow, 2008
Wasserfarbe auf Papier
45 x 60 cm
Lara, Victory day Moscow, 2008
Aquarell auf Papier
45 x 60 cm
Looking For Lara, Moscow, 2008
Aquarell auf Papier
45 x 60 cm
Red square, Moscow, 2008
Aquarell auf Papier
60 x 45 cm
Victory day 9th of May, 2008
Öl auf MDF
60 x 80 cm
 
Danish artist Cecilia Westerberg takes Boris Pasternak’s partly autobiographical novel Dr. Zhivago as her point of departure
and works with different aspects of displacement in the individual and collective memory.
In the first part of the exhibition Cecilia Westerberg takes her starting point in a number of interviews, with people who have seen
the classical film Dr. Zhivago from 1965. Westerberg examines, through simple questions about which scenes, figures or things
that has made the greatest impression, how our memory of Dr. Zhivago is part of our collective image-bank and therefore collective
memory. And at the same time is an entirely different part of our individual memory.
In the first room of the exhibition Cecilia Westerberg is showing oil paintings with scenes from Dr. Zhivago. The scenes are chosen
partly from the answers from the interviews.
In the second part of the exhibition Cecilia Westerberg takes her point of departure in her own journey to Russia and focuses on the
interaction between fiction and reality.
In Spring 2008 Cecilia Westerberg traveled to Peredelkino, where Boris Pasternak lived and wrote the book Dr. Zhivago. In this part of
the exhibition Westerberg once again focuses on how fiction meets reality. This time though, it’s through her own experience of the
odyssey from (film) fiction to reality – and finally her meeting with Russia. Westerberg especially focuses on her experience of the
Americanized film version of Dr. Zhivago and a contemporary Russia year 2008.
The account of Westerberg’s journey has turned into a video, oil paintings and aquarelles from Moscow.  
 
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